Seasonal Inspiration:
Eight Things to Do with Salmon

Salmon Bites ChefSteps

Here in the Pacific Northwest, we’re just a wee bit obsessed with salmon—particularly at this time of year. When you buy it fresh at a trusty fish counter, there’s no end to what you can do with a gorgeous hunk of sockeye or chinook. In the warm months, grilled salmon makes for a lovely light dinner. But if you’re burnt out on the cedar plank, we’ve got ideas to inspire you all year long.

Unsure about how to select the best fish? Consult our video for tips on seafood shopping, then move on to our handy salmon butchering tutorial. After that, it’s time to get cooking. Oh, and should questions arise, please pose them in the comments. We’re always here to help—and, (you may have already noticed), we do love talking about salmon.

1. Pass it around

Cancel the caterer. Your guests will be über-impressed to learn you made these elegant Salmon Bites all by your lonesome. Brined, cooked at a low temperature, then chilled overnight, the fish takes on a dense, rich texture. Augment with watercress purée, pickled onion, and Horseradish Cream and serve as an amuse-bouche before brunch or a passed snack at your next garden party.

Salmon_104_bites_FINAL

2. Roll on

Master our technique for Fish Roulade, and you’ll use it time and time again when you need a fancy, yet foolproof, seafood preparation. Our favorite way to serve salmon roulade? Quickly seared and dressed in Piccata Sauce.

3. Discover the cure

Loving curing meats? You must see how expediently this Quick-Cured Salmon method turns raw fish into something toothsome and full of flavor.

4. Chop it up

Topped with fresh chervil and a few orbs of ikura roe, our handsome Salmon Tartare classes up an outdoor dinner and showcases the awesome fresh fish available this time of year.

Salmon_tartare

5. Perfect your plating

Looking to bone up on your plating skills? Use our lemon oil–enhanced Salmon Crudo recipe to help you master the basics of composing the sort of sexy dish you find in fine-dining restaurants.

6. Have a smoke

To make Salmon Pastrami, brine your fish in our signature brine, give it a good rub, then smoke it to bring out that savory-sweet flavor. Mmmm…salmon candy.

Smoked_Salmon_FINAL

7. Wait it out

Our PNW Salmon requires some planning—you’ll need to make the Salmon Katsuobushi months in advance—but it is So. Very. Worth it.

8. Explore modern cooking techniques

The dish that launched ChefSteps, our Salmon 104 °F is a great way to begin exploring modernist techniques and walks you through the steps of creating one of our all-time prettiest plates.

final_dish_salmon 104Click here to check out other salmon recipes, or upload your own by clicking “Add Recipe.”

 

Seasonal Inspiration:Eight Things to Do with Salmon

Salmon Bites ChefSteps

Here in the Pacific Northwest, we’re just a wee bit obsessed with salmon—particularly at this time of year. When you buy it fresh at a trusty fish counter, there’s no end to what you can do with a gorgeous hunk of sockeye or chinook. In the warm months, grilled salmon makes for a lovely light dinner. But if you’re burnt out on the cedar plank, we’ve got ideas to inspire you all year long.

Unsure about how to select the best fish? Consult our video for tips on seafood shopping, then move on to our handy salmon butchering tutorial. After that, it’s time to get cooking. Oh, and should questions arise, please pose them in the comments. We’re always here to help—and, (you may have already noticed), we do love talking about salmon.

1. Pass it around

Cancel the caterer. Your guests will be über-impressed to learn you made these elegant Salmon Bites all by your lonesome. Brined, cooked at a low temperature, then chilled overnight, the fish takes on a dense, rich texture. Augment with watercress purée, pickled onion, and Horseradish Cream and serve as an amuse-bouche before brunch or a passed snack at your next garden party.

Salmon_104_bites_FINAL

2. Roll on

Master our technique for Fish Roulade, and you’ll use it time and time again when you need a fancy, yet foolproof, seafood preparation. Our favorite way to serve salmon roulade? Quickly seared and dressed in Piccata Sauce.

3. Discover the cure

Loving curing meats? You must see how expediently this Quick-Cured Salmon method turns raw fish into something toothsome and full of flavor.

4. Chop it up

Topped with fresh chervil and a few orbs of ikura roe, our handsome Salmon Tartare classes up an outdoor dinner and showcases the awesome fresh fish available this time of year.

Salmon_tartare

5. Perfect your plating

Looking to bone up on your plating skills? Use our lemon oil–enhanced Salmon Crudo recipe to help you master the basics of composing the sort of sexy dish you find in fine-dining restaurants.

6. Have a smoke

To make Salmon Pastrami, brine your fish in our signature brine, give it a good rub, then smoke it to bring out that savory-sweet flavor. Mmmm…salmon candy.

Smoked_Salmon_FINAL

7. Wait it out

Our PNW Salmon requires some planning—you’ll need to make the Salmon Katsuobushi months in advance—but it is So. Very. Worth it.

8. Explore modern cooking techniques

The dish that launched ChefSteps, our Salmon 104 °F is a great way to begin exploring modernist techniques and walks you through the steps of creating one of our all-time prettiest plates.

final_dish_salmon 104Click here to check out other salmon recipes, or upload your own by clicking “Add Recipe.”

 

ChefSteps Forum | It’s Meatless Monday!

Michael Natkin issued the first ChefSteps sous vide vegetarian challenge last week on our forum. The objective was to use the sous vide method to make a great meatless main course to wow us. There were some really spectacular dishes and once again, we were knocked out by your efforts and results. Grant, Chris, and Kristina Krug (filling in for Ryan) each picked a favorite dish and since Grant and Chris picked the same dish and it was Michael’s challenge, he also chose a favorite to feature on our Pinterest board.

Grant Crilly: My favorite this week has to be Chris Koller’s sous vide ricotta gnocchi. It is a huge surprise to me that this technique was even an option. After many years of making cheese myself, and using a C-Vap and water bath for the curds, I always went to the pot on the stove for ricotta. What was I thinking? This is a real eye opener for me, I love it! Keep it up, Mr. Koller.

Chris Young: I’m with Grant on this one, Chris Koller did an awesome job!

 

Kristina Krug: I’m choosing Allen Johnson’s Bangan Bartha this week. He did a wonderful job at visually displaying the dish, in addition to his prep. The colors were vibrant and I really liked the angles of the shots. Looking forward to seeing more photos from Allen in the future!

 

Michael Natkin: My pick of the week is Brian Douglas’ BarBiBimBapQue . I love the cross-pollination of Southern flavors with the Korean presentation and twists. I’m a sucker for the contrast of savory flavors with the sweet punch from the peaches. Nice work!

Thank you to everyone on the ChefSteps forum and followers of Herbivoracious for your participation. We hope you are enjoying these challenges as much as we are!

Grant, Chris, Ryan, and the rest of the ChefSteps team.

ChefSteps Forum | Breakfast for Dinner Culinary Challenge

Last week, Grant Crilly issued the first ChefSteps culinary challenge on our forum. The objective was to use the sous vide method to make a meal or dish that featured breakfast fare for dinner. We could not be more pleased with all of the effort that everybody put into the challenge and we are thrilled by all the resulting dishes that were prepared. As promised, Grant, Ryan and Chris each picked a dish to highlight, so I’ll let them weigh in on their choices and get busy pinning the chosen dishes to our Pinterest board.

Grant Crilly: It has been amazing to see so many individuals come to our site, get engaged and learn new skills. More amazing, to me, is how quickly our students have picked up new skills and adapted to foods they already know and love. This week’s challenge was the first for ChefSteps and it could not have gone better. Chris, Ryan, and I have each chosen a dish that stood out to us. This week, my favorite would have to be Jim’s sous vide chorizo infused French toast with 64 °C poached egg. I loved the presentation and that he really focused on doing one thing really well, and letting the rest support his main idea. Very beautiful presentation. Congrats, Jim!

 


Ryan Matthew Smith: As our photographer, I’ve picked Mason Perry’s sous vide breakfast gyro and egg. I really liked his presentation of the dish and the perspective he shot from for the photo. Great job, Mason.


Chris Young: So, I’m truly impressed and humbled by all of the effort people put into our first culinary challenge. I look forward to seeing what our students will do this week. I’m going to single out Lachlan Hunt this week for his modernist take on the “full Aussie” with a twist. I happen to know that his adaptation of Heston Blumenthal’s historic “meat fruit” recipe is difficult to execute and his convincing job of making a breakfast banger look like roast tomato is clever, and I suspect, delicious. Good job, Lachlan.

We can’t wait to see what you all come up with for Michael Natkin’s sous vide vegetarian challenge this week!

Thank you to everyone on the forum for your ongoing invaluable participation, whether in the challenge, Q&A, or most important, encouraging each other along the way.

Grant, Chris, Ryan, and the rest of the ChefSteps team.